What Did the Open Fuel Standard Act of 2011 Say?

The Open Fuel Standard Act essentially says that by 2017 automakers will no longer be allowed to make cars that run only on gasoline. The bill says that by 2017, ninety-five percent of all cars made in the United States will be in that category.

The category includes flex fuel (capable of burning gasoline, ethanol or methanol or any combination of these), natural gas, hydrogen, biodiesel, plug-in electric, and fuel cell. The bill will provide certainty to investors to produce alternative fuels and fueling stations. Below is the core of the bill, quoted from the bill itself:

Each manufacturer’s fleet of covered vehicles for a particular model year shall be comprised of:

 

(1) not less than 50 percent qualified vehicles beginning in model year 2014;

(2) not less than 80 percent qualified vehicles beginning in model year 2016; and

(3) not less than 95 percent qualified vehicles beginning in model year 2017 and each subsequent year.

“Qualified vehicle” means a covered vehicle that:

(A) has been warranted by its manufacturer to operate solely on natural gas, hydrogen, or biodiesel;

(B) is a flexible fuel vehicle;

(C) is a plug-in electric drive vehicle;

(D) is propelled solely by fuel cell that produces power without the use of petroleum or a petroleum-based fuel; or

(E) is propelled solely by something other than an internal combustion engine, and produces power without the use of petroleum or a petroleum-based fuel;

The term `flexible fuel vehicle’ means a vehicle that has been warranted by its manufacturer to operate on gasoline, E85, and M85.

The term `E85′ means a fuel mixture containing 85 percent ethanol and 15 percent gasoline by volume;

The term `M85′ means a fuel mixture containing 85 percent methanol and 15 percent gasoline by volume;

The term `biodiesel’ means diesel fuel which has been produced from a non-petroleum feedstock and which meets the standards of ASTM D6751-03.